Peripherals Reviews

Endgame Gear XM1 – Gaming Mouse with Unexpected Strengths

With the XM1, not only a new mouse comes onto the market, but also a new brand for gaming products: The XM1 comes from “Endgame Gear”. But the company behind Endgame Gear is not completely unknown, because it is also responsible for Noblechairs and Nitro Concepts and therefore not a newcomer on the market of gaming products.

The debut XM1 should not be an entry with a typical average product. Instead, the mouse directly dares a lot and offers an unusual tuning for 60 Euros: high-end sensor, five keys, symmetrical design – so far so common.

The selected Omron switches are to be installed in order to offer a comparable feeling of pressure with all keys, and the reaction time of the device is to be clearly reduced by the use of an analog sensor for the signal recognition. In addition, the 70 gram mouse is a lightweight model that does not offer RGB lighting.

Whether Endgame Gear succeeds with the XM1 to stand out in the peripheral market right away, and how the advertised features perform in practice, we see in the following test.

Scope of Delivery

Endgame Gear is limited to the essentials when it comes to packaging and scope of delivery: The XM1 comes in a standard coloured cardboard box; the mouse is packed in foam. Apart from a card with additional information about the software and the mouse settings, there’s nothing in the box.

Design and Workmanship

The XM1 uses a symmetrical housing with additional keys placed on one side. Therefore, you can only use the full functionality of the mouse as a right-handed mouse. The two additional keys are located on the left above the thumb rest and serve, as usual, as a back and forth key.

Endgame Gear uses the same matt black plastic for the whole mouse. The quality of workmanship is good throughout – the mouse is stable, the gap dimensions are uniform throughout and the edges of the individual case parts are at the usual level.

The matt black plastic has a very pleasant feel and gives the mouse a simple design. Compared to some other gaming enthusiasts, the XM1 looks more like an office mouse, which of course doesn’t have to be a bad thing. In this case, it probably means that cleaning the mouse is much easier than for products with high-gloss elements or structured surfaces.

The mouse’s simple impression is also enhanced by the fact that there is no LED lighting. The logo on the back of the mouse is therefore printed and not, as usual, illuminated by an LED. In practice, this means less weight and thus contributes to the actual objective of the mouse. LEDs may be beautiful, but they don’t give the user an advantage and, on the contrary, make the mouse a little heavier.

But the mouse doesn’t really get by without LEDs: At the bottom two LEDs show the current configuration of the mouse. The combination of how the LEDs light up symbolizes the polling rate, the color the currently selected DPI profile. Both can be changed via the button on the bottom. Apart from that there are no other special features.

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Simon Lüthje

I am co-founder of this blog and am very interested in everything that has to do with technology, but I also like to play games. I was born in Hamburg, but now I live in Berlin.

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