Peripherals Reviews

Glorious PC Gaming Race Model O Review – 68 grams for a Hallelujah?

The Glorious PC Gaming Race brand, inspired by the official PCMasterRace-Subreddit, has been a niche player in Germany so far. But the Model O Gaming Mouse is about to change this. With an effective RGB lighting, a very low weight and a high-quality sensor the mouse should be able to convince above all Shooter players.

Will Glorious’s first work succeed or is the name just sound and smoke?

Packaging

The Model O comes in an eye-catching cardboard box. If you open it, you will first find the prominently placed mouse. Below it is a Quick Start Guide, two stickers, a thank-you note and an info sheet introducing Glorious’s clear product range.

Replacement skates and a microfiber cloth to clean the mouse would have been useful accessories, but are unfortunately not included in the packaging. This is the case with most mice.

Design and Features

Model O is available in two colours (black, white) and just as many surface textures (matt, glossy). The test sample is the glossy-black version.

Probably the most striking element of the mouse is the back of the top. A honeycomb pattern has been incorporated into this. This not only looks chic, but also lowers the weight. A nice side effect is the passive ventilation of the palm. Thus the hand sweats less.

For Palm Grip players with larger hands, the mouse made of plastic and rubber may be too short to operate the scroll wheel comfortably. However, fingertip and claw grip do not lead to any ergonomic problems. However, Claw-Grip users have a better alternative from the same source: the model O-. This is a bit smaller (and therefore also lighter) than the normal Model O.

Left and right mouse buttons also partly have the honeycomb pattern. The Omron buttons under the two buttons provide a well audible, but not annoying click noise and should, according to the manufacturer, endure 20 million clicks.

Between the two buttons is the coarsely grooved and rubber-coated scroll wheel. The scrolling itself has a strongly defined grid and is relatively quiet, with a dark tone.

The DPI cycle button is located behind the scroll wheel. It switches, on pressure, between six predefined DPI settings. An LED on the underside, which was placed next to the sensor, informs about the currently used DPI setting.

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Simon Lüthje

I am co-founder of this blog and am very interested in everything that has to do with technology, but I also like to play games. I was born in Hamburg, but now I live in Berlin.

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