Peripherals Reviews

Samsung The Space Review: 32-inch Monitor with Special Stand

The new Samsung The Space Monitor tries to differentiate itself from the competition’s models by its space-saving mounting. Whether the new concept can convince and whether the Samsung The Space Monitor can convince not only by its design, but also technically, we show in our following test. Currently the Samsung The Space Monitor is offered in two versions, soon a third version especially for gamers will follow. The review refers to the 32-inch model of the monitor.

Versions of the Samsung The Space

Samsung The Space 27-inch

The 27-inch model of Samsung The Space is currently available for 379 Euro. The resolution of the VA panel is WQHD (2560 x 1440 pixels). The maximum brightness is 250 cd/m², the contrast ratio is 3000:1 and the refresh rate 144 Hz. With a response time of 4 ms, the Samsung monitor can’t keep up with high-end gaming monitors, but casual gamers should also be satisfied with the Samsung The Space 27-inch for fast shooters.

Samsung The Space 32-inch

With 32 inch screen diagonal the Samsung The Space Monitor has 489 Euro. Unfortunately, the VA panel with its 4K resolution (3840 x 2160 pixels) offers only 60 Hz refresh rate, which makes the monitor a bad choice even for casual gamers. As with the 27-inch model, the response time is 4 ms, and the brightness is also identical with a maximum of 250 cd/m². Unfortunately, the contrast ratio of the larger model is only 2500:1.

Samsung The Space 32-inch as “Gaming Version”

In addition to the two already available models, Samsung also announced a Gaming version in 32-inch at Gamescom 2019, which offers 144 Hz refresh rate at WQHD resolution (2560 x 1440 pixels). According to Samsung, there are no differences between the gaming version and the 32 inch The Space Monitor, except for the other panel. At which price the monitor with AMD Radeon FreeSync support will come on the market Samsung has not yet announced during the show.

New Mounting Concept and Ergonomics

Instead of a conventional stand, the Samsung The Space Monitor has a clamp that can be attached to tables up to 90 mm thick. The mounting concept is only known when using an additionally purchased monitor mount like the Arctic Z2 Pro (Gen 2), which costs between 50 and 100 Euros depending on the model. Due to the lack of a VESA hole for mounting alternative mounts, Samsung The Space users are limited to the supplied stand.

According to Samsung, the new fixing option should create space on the table where only a small part of the edge of the table is clamped. The space saving is also enormous in reality in comparison to the feet that are usually quite protruding on 32-inch monitors. When upright, The Space Monitor is directly on the wall and occupies only a few centimetres of the desk.

Unfortunately, the concept also has a decisive disadvantage which, in my opinion, significantly devalues the actually clever solution. This is due to the height adjustment of the monitor, which can only be done by pulling the monitor towards the user via the central hinge, which also changes the inclination of the display. Paradoxically, the concept, which was actually designed to save space on the desk, ensures that a height adjustment of the image close to the desk top ensures that the monitor requires even more space during work than models with a conventional stand. On the positive side, the mounting clamp hardly wobbles, even though it is anchored to the tabletop with a screw.

In addition to the height adjustment, the ergonomics of the Samsung The Space Monitor are also severely restricted by the new mounting concept. The monitor therefore lacks not only the pivot function (90 degree rotation) but also the swivel function (rotation around its own axis). Only the inclination of the monitor can be freely adjusted by the large hinge.

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Simon Lüthje

I am co-founder of this blog and am very interested in everything that has to do with technology, but I also like to play games. I was born in Hamburg, but now I live in Berlin.

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