Hardware Reviews

Thermaltake Level 20 VT Review – The “Pocket Rocket” Among the Cases?!

Exterior Impression

The Thermaltake Level 20 VT is very conspicuous on the outside. The steel body is covered on four sides with tempered glass elements. This makes it look a bit like an aquarium at first glance. But let’s start in the front. This is characterized by a large tempered glass disc and was printed in the lower area with the name and logo of the manufacturer. The rest of the front panel consists of plastic and two silver accent strips, which are also made of plastic. To protect the interior from dust, there is also a dust filter behind the glass pane. However, this is made of a rather coarse mesh and probably only holds back the most necessary. The front panel can be pulled off with a powerful jerk and provides a view of the pre-installed 200 mm fan.

Like the front, the lid is dominated by a large tempered glass element. This element is mounted on a steel frame with a pull-off aid and is fastened to the rear with two knurled screws. In addition, the pane was lifted slightly with four standoffs. This creates a gap through which the warm air can pass from the inside to the outside. In the front area of the cover there is also the I/O panel pointing upwards. This was equipped with two USB 3.0 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, and two HD audio headers for headphones and microphone.

The left and right side parts are similar in construction to the glass element in the lid. The only difference, however, is that the side panels are flush with the body and there is no gap for air circulation.

A look at the back reveals another special feature of the cube housing. At level 20 VT the mainboard tray is mounted horizontally. The mounting position for the power supply unit and the HDD cage are located in a chamber below. Expansion cards are screwed outside the housing.

Also the bottom has a removable element, which was provided with a fine dust filter for the power supply unit and further fan openings. It’s a shame, however, that the additional fan opening in the floor doesn’t have a dust filter.

The general workmanship is good. There are no paint defects or sharp edges. In addition, all modular elements are flush and there are no conspicuous gap dimensions.

Internal impression

If you free the body from all side parts and the front panel, you strictly speaking get a frame with an internal volume of almost 50 litres. As mentioned in the previous section, the mainboard tray is horizontal at level 20 and has punched out spacers for the mainboard. In addition, there is a large cut-out for the subsequent mounting of CPU coolers with backplate. Unfortunately Thermaltake did not provide special openings for the cable management for the mainboard sled.

The power supply is placed below the mainboard level. In addition, there is an HDD cage for up to three 3.5″ or 2.5″ media. If this cage is not needed, it can also be dismantled by removing three screws. For those who want to use even more hard disks in the Thermaltake, there are three more frames for 2.5″ SSDs or HDDs on the right side. These are made of plastic and have a mechanism for tool-free fastening. Also here Thermaltake relies on a simple fastening with a knurled screw per frame.

In the upper area, the manufacturer has also added four rails with various holes. These serve as possible holding points for radiators when water cooling is installed. The rails are made of metal and the bracket looks solid.

Mounting rails for radiators

If you take a closer look at the body, you will soon notice that all sides are the same size. This makes it possible to exchange all side windows and the floor element. If you don’t like the horizontal position of the mainboard, you could rotate the body as well as 90 degrees. The I/O and front panels can also be remounted accordingly.

Symmetrical side panels
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Simon Lüthje

I am co-founder of this blog and am very interested in everything that has to do with technology, but I also like to play games. I was born in Hamburg, but now I live in Berlin.

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