Peripherals Reviews

Gaming Mouse Razer Viper Ultimate – Razer’s New Wireless Technology Tested

Ergonomics and Buttons

Despite the angular design, the Razer Viper Ultimate lies really well in the hand. The flat design makes it even better for larger hands than mice with a semicircular design. The low weight ensures that nothing is felt in the hand. Players who want to add weights to customize the mouse to their personal needs will unfortunately be disappointed.

Optical switches seem to be popular with Razer right now. The Huntsman Tournament Edition already uses opto-mechanical switches. Also with the Viper Ultimate the mouse clicks are captured by infrared light. The reaction time is reduced to 0.2 milliseconds due to the superfluous physical contact. This also improves durability, as there is hardly any wear – the result is a service life of 70 million clicks.

The grid of the mouse wheel is clearly noticeable, yet it is easy to turn. The mouse wheel can also be pressed. The thumb buttons are also convincing. They are well fitted and do not tilt. The most important thing is the pressure point, because it happens more often that the keys cannot be pressed well. This is not the case with the Viper Ultimate.

Equipment

The Viper Ultimate uses a sensor that Razer developed together with Pixart. The Focus+ sensor is supposed to resolve with real 20.000 DPI at 99,6% accuracy. For improved precision, additional functions are available. Motion Sync, for example, synchronizes the mouse signals with the polling intervals of the PC. Casual gamers probably won’t notice any difference to a cheaper mouse. But professionals who rarely see wireless mice will be pleased. More information and graphics about the Focus+ sensor from Razer can be found on the product page. In general it can be said that Razer uses a really high quality sensor in the mouse. Combined with the ergonomics, this results in first-class handling.

An efficient sensor also improves battery life. Without lighting, the battery should last about 70 hours. We certainly don’t have the 70 hours full yet, but the battery lasts about 40 hours without any problems. If you forget to charge the mouse, you can also connect it with the USB cable and continue playing. The illuminated dock is included for loading the mouse. At the beginning it’s a bit fiddly to place the mouse on the dock, after that it’s held by a magnet.

Poling rate of the Hyperspeed technology in comparison

HyperSpeed Wireless is designed to make you forget you’re playing with a wireless mouse. This is made possible by Adaptive Frequency Technology. Every millisecond is scanned for free channels and possible interference. If frequencies are used by other devices, Razer makes sure that switching is fast.  It has also been designed to improve data transfer time between the mouse and PC. According to Razer, this is the lowest click latency ever measured.

So let’s make a brief comparison with the Logitech G Pro Wireless. In fact, there’s no noticeable difference in technology. Both mice respond precisely, there are no dropouts or anything else. The only real difference is in the design.

Software

For the Viper Ultimate we have to use Razer Synapse 3. As usual with Razer, we can really configure everything. It’s possible to customize every single key, even the left and right mouse buttons. It’s possible to store other functions or macros.

Razer himself claims that they pre-configured the mouse in the best possible way. But if you want improvements or just want to fine tune the sensor, Razer Synapse can also do it for you.

The lighting can either be adjusted especially for the mouse, but the Chroma Studio can also be used to configure other Razer products, so that they all have the same effect and even synchronously. The Viper Ultimate is the only one with an illuminated logo, so there aren’t many effects.

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Simon Lüthje

I am co-founder of this blog and am very interested in everything that has to do with technology, but I also like to play games. I was born in Hamburg, but now I live in Berlin.

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